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Saturday 25 November 2017
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Update: City Releases Water Test Results on Open Data Portal

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By Staff –

 

syracuse

(Update, Sept. 20) – The city has released the results of Water Department tests on Skaneateles Lake water on DataCuse, the city’s open data portal.

City officials released the data after the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) recently announced blue-green algae blooms with elevated toxicity had been found along the shore of Skaneateles Lake.

“We continue to perform regular testing of Skaneateles Lake water to determine the impact of any algae blooms on the city’s water supply,” Mayor Stephanie Miner stated. “We work with our partners in other government agencies to test for toxicity in the water. Making sure this information is public and transparent is our priority.”

Visit http://data.syrgov.net/datasets/skaneateles-lake-water-testing to access the information, which the city will update daily.

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(From Sept. 18) – The city has announced that testing conducted by the city of Syracuse Department of Water showed there was no blue-green algae blooms found impacting city of Syracuse water systems.

Over the weekend, the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced blue-green algae blooms with elevated toxicity had been found along the shore of Skaneateles Lake.

“This is good news for city water customers,” Mayor Stephanie Miner stated. “We take our responsibility to safeguard our water supply very seriously, through meticulous testing and public reporting. We continue to proactively be in contact with the Department of Health and the DEC, where staff assured us there is no threat to city water supplies at this time. We will continue to conduct testing and monitor this situation.”

Testing was done over the weekend by Water Department employees, and Department of Health officials, and is continually being conducted at the intake pipes and throughout the city’s water system.

Blue-green algae blooms grow in stagnant water with sunlight, and city intakes are in deep water far from the shoreline, city officials said.

Check back for additional updates.

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