Howie Hawkins Announces Third Run In Gubernatorial Race

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Howie-HawkinsPolitical activist Howie Hawkins has announced his third consecutive run in the gubernatorial race against incumbent Governor Andrew Cuomo, according to Syracuse.com.

This Syracuse-based Green party activist has thrown his hat in the ring for the 22nd time in his life in a concentrated attempt to drive the narrative of environmentalism and the progressive left.

Still spry for 65, Hawkins seems passionate about leveling the political playing field by creating a publicly funded campaign finance institute. The idealistic goal is to end campaign finance corruption nationwide.

As with any Green party voice, though, Hawkins holds the environment close to his heart.

According to an interview on Wednesday, Hawkins has a plan if his bid for office succeeds. It would include implementing a “single-payer healthcare system, a ban on new fossil fuel plants and pipelines, and a switch to 100 percent clean, renewable energy within 15 years.”

Certainly ambitious in the current political climate, the plans in question would face serious opposition, likely from both sides of the aisle. Yet they are issues Hawkins and other Green party representatives believe to be both more connected and more pressingly important than Congress seems to believe.

An estimated 178,560 cases of melanoma are projected to be diagnosed in 2018 in the United States alone. How is this statistic generated?

The increased rates of melanoma (skin cancer) are following a close correlation with the rate of ozone layer depletion. This is a problem that’s even more pronounced in the United States.

With health care costs accelerating out of control, and the environmental impacts that cause health issues doing the same, people are getting sick more regularly. Then they can’t afford treatment.

While there might be a good deal of truth to the concerns raised by the Green party, it is hard to find a solution that works for everyone.

Though the rapidly degrading natural environment has been heavily politicized over recent years, there are some small pieces of good news that could reflect a cultural change in the way Americans see environmentalism.

First, natural gas consumption is on the decline. In fact, American homes on average consume 40% less natural gas than 40 years ago.

Additionally, initiatives in the U.K. to reduce plastic bag consumption are actually working. In ocean trawls by data collectors, a 30% decline in plastic bag pollution was recorded since the introduction of reusable bags into most supermarkets. Perhaps this is not terribly surprising since if you switched to reusable bags, you would reduce global plastic bag consumption by 22,000 bags in your lifetime.

Regardless of these minor successes, the ozone layer is still damaged, ocean temperatures are still rising, and environmentalists are still struggling to find a foothold in the American political system. For Howie Hawkins, the goal is to keep on trying in the face of ever-present adversity.

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